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UK’s most haunted places to visit by train this Halloween

Hellfire Caves, Buckinghamshire

Considered to be one of the most haunted locations in the UK, these caves were once home to the Hellfire Club and society of wealthy and powerful men in the 18th century who threw debauched parties and dabbled in the occult, all from the cave’s inner temple. The paranormal activity in the in the caves are attributed by many to the black magic rituals that once took place here. The most common ghost sightings at Hellfire Caves is Sukie, a local girl who was reportedly murdered here and visitors claim they can often hear her crying and screaming as she paces the tunnels…

If you are planning a visit to the caves, don’t forget that you can get 2for1 entry when you travel by train with Days Out Guide! Click here for more info.

Plan your journey to the caves, by popping in Head to High Wycombe for the nearest station and search for the cheapest fare.

Pendle Hill, Lancashire

In 1612, Pendle Hill saw one of Britain’s most famous witch trials take place, after 12 people were accused of murder by witchcraft and subsequently hanged. Not only were the Pendle witches hanged here, but it is also the site of a Bronze Age burial site and said to be one of the spookiest places in the UK.

Head to Clitheroe and collect the Pendle Witch Hopper bus which connects to Downham and begin your journey to the Pendle Hill summit

The Golden Fleece, York 

Founded in 1503, this The Golden Fleece is not only is it the oldest inn in York, but it can also claim to be York’s most haunted pub. You could find yourself sharing a glass or two with the pub’s ghostly residents, One Eyed Jack or even Lady Alice Peckett, so you’ll never be
short of company here.

Enter your journey details and set your destination to York and plan your journey with National rail Enquiries

Jump on board a ghost bus tour in York with Days Out Guide’s 2for1 offer when you show your train ticket! You can even get 2for1 tickets for the National Rail Museum in York, if you fancy something a little less spooky to end the day

South Bridge Vaults, Edinburgh

A.K.A ‘City of the Dead’

The 19 arches that make up Edinburgh’s ‘cursed’ South Bridge, were home Edinburgh’s poorest members of society, who slept in these squalid conditions, without sunlight, fresh air, running water or sanitation. The vaults also found favour with the more murderous elements of society and were rumoured to be a popular hunting ground for
Burke and Hare, the infamous serial killers, who preyed upon the vault’s inhabitants for their latest victims.

Head to Edinburgh Waverly railway station to begin your journey and get 2for1 tickets for the Edinburgh Ghost Bus Tours when you travel by train.

Chislehurst Caves, Kent

Comprising 22 miles of some of the most haunted tunnels in the UK, Chislehurst caves has been home to many different inhabitants of the centuries, but perhaps none more fascinating than the supernatural kind. Just some of these spectral residents are said to be a woman drowned many years ago in a pool situated deep in the tunnels, a cavalier, a horse, a woman pushing a pram, a Druid, a spectral imp, and a black dog.

Only a few decades ago, some brave souls attempted the Chislehurst Challenge and agreed to spend the night alone in the caves, but only one man made it through the night, a police officer who claimed that he had felt a ghostly presence with him the entire night….

Chislehurst railway station is only a short walk away from these amazing caves. Plan your journey right here. Don’t forget you can also get 2for1 entry when you travel by train with Days Out Guide!

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